We all can do our part for the planet

Water Crisis Could Mean Potential GDP Loss of More Than 5%

 

A report by the World Bank states that some areas of the world could observe an increase in migration patterns and social conflict as a result of the global water crisis. 

The report claims that by influence of global warming, the global water crisis will continue to ravage the economies of some areas throughout the world, causing as much as a 6% loss in nation GDP.  Especially intriguing, is the premise that the shortage of water has the potential to foreseeably alter migration patterns, coaxing inhabitants of countries lacking the resource to establish residence in areas less threatened by the scarcity. Further, due to the social and economic change, the report ascertains that an increase in conflict will also become notable. 

A collaboration between an increasing populace, inflating incomes, and developing cities will undoubtedly drive the demand for water resources substantially upward, simply extending the crisis as the population migrates from one locale to the next – making regions once unscathed by the shortage left to conserve in order to survive. Regions already plagued by water scarcity will suffer immensely as the problem only grows worse. 

Action is necessary if there is to be any hope of mitigating such a long-standing issue. Not only does a lack of water influence the migration of the people of these nations, but it also influences the longevity and sustainability of agriculture, the health of the people, and even the economy – the report projecting that the GDP will take a nearly 6% hit. Warning that freshwater will become rapidly depleted while energy and agriculture projects place an added stress on the availability of the resource, the report shows concern that the water supply will dwindle by as much as two-thirds over the course of the next 30 years. 

Not often perceived as a true threat to the ability of the economy to achieve steady growth, the impact that water shortages make on the stability of the global economy are consistently enhancing the detrimental effects of global warming. In order to avoid sustained periods of economic loss, regions at risk for the biggest negative impact need to begin implementing policies and processes that are capable of mitigating an impending large problem. 

The good news is that the potential loss can be alleviated when governments act proactively to aid efficiency and utilize water in a productive manner. Improving water conservation and efficiency has the power to dramatically remedy a sustained crisis. 

Interested in learning more about advanced water treatment systems to help alleviate the water crisis? Contact us today. 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

4 Questions to Ask Before Buying a Water Tank!

4 Questions to Ask Before Buying a Water Tank! We talk to people everyday about their tanks. Over 4000 people a year in fact. We know the important but not so obvious questions to ask before you make the big decision to invest in a water tank. Here they are: 1) What’s on the inside

[Read More …]

Reports Claim Contaminated Water Disbursement Prevalent Among Population

According to a report recently made available by the environmental activist group, Natural Resources Defense Council, more than 75 million Americans were consuming contaminated water that had been dispensed by their local municipal water systems. The contaminated water in question was found to contain elevated levels of lead and copper – both of which are capable of causing serious health problems when consumed.

As budget cuts led to the development of a proposal to eliminate spending for programs designed to protect community drinking water, the risk placed on small communities in need of replacement of outdated and deteriorating water systems continues to increase. The threat of this new reality is most prevalent in rural communities, as records show that it is the small, rural communities that encounter the most violations and highest levels of contamination. The disproportion in water quality is largely due to lack of financial resources and technological availability – the problem is expected to continue to worsen as budget cuts begin to be implemented.

Contaminants like lead, copper, arsenic, and certain bacteria pose a substantial risk to the water systems, water quality, and the health of the public. Sadly, nearly two million American people have lived in communities where they were unknowingly exposed to a highly-contaminated water supply, where regulations were insufficient and poorly enforced. Many of these communities were small – maintaining consistency of the claim that small communities remain most at risk. In fact, well over half of the water quality violations and health-related claims reported took place within these smaller, neglected communities.

At the heart of the matter is the consistently lacking financial resources. Smaller communities simply cannot afford the equipment and maintenance necessary to adhere to the regulations that have been put into place in an effort to maintain consistency and accountability of water quality. Thankfully, the NRDC continues to advocate for the right of all communities to have access to clean water, free of harmful contaminants.

As published in their report, the NRDC asserts that an increase in funding is not only suggested but necessary in order to establish a safe supply of drinking water for the population and better the economy. Explaining that the proposal would create jobs and make meeting regulations attainable, the system would create and uphold a higher standard of purity as a target goal created on the foundation laid by the Safe Water Drinking Act of 1974 – legislation that was responsible for establishing the monitoring of drinking water in regards to a set of standards for protecting the health of the community.

In order to secure a truly safe supply of drinking water, officials must take into consideration the health of the communities and prioritize the updating of aging water systems, the enforcement of water quality standards, and ensure that future funding for maintenance is available to maintain the highest quality drinking water – and the EPA is working to do just that as they continue to persevere towards their goal.

[Read More …]

Reports Claim Contaminated Water Disbursement Prevalent Among Population

According to a report recently made available by the environmental activist group, Natural Resources Defense Council, more than 75 million Americans were consuming contaminated water that had been dispensed by their local municipal water systems. The contaminated water in question was found to contain elevated levels of lead and copper – both of which are capable of causing serious health problems when consumed.

As budget cuts led to the development of a proposal to eliminate spending for programs designed to protect community drinking water, the risk placed on small communities in need of replacement of outdated and deteriorating water systems continues to increase. The threat of this new reality is most prevalent in rural communities, as records show that it is the small, rural communities that encounter the most violations and highest levels of contamination. The disproportion in water quality is largely due to lack of financial resources and technological availability – the problem is expected to continue to worsen as budget cuts begin to be implemented.

Contaminants like lead, copper, arsenic, and certain bacteria pose a substantial risk to the water systems, water quality, and the health of the public. Sadly, nearly two million American people have lived in communities where they were unknowingly exposed to a highly-contaminated water supply, where regulations were insufficient and poorly enforced. Many of these communities were small – maintaining consistency of the claim that small communities remain most at risk. In fact, well over half of the water quality violations and health-related claims reported took place within these smaller, neglected communities.

At the heart of the matter is the consistently lacking financial resources. Smaller communities simply cannot afford the equipment and maintenance necessary to adhere to the regulations that have been put into place in an effort to maintain consistency and accountability of water quality. Thankfully, the NRDC continues to advocate for the right of all communities to have access to clean water, free of harmful contaminants.

As published in their report, the NRDC asserts that an increase in funding is not only suggested but necessary in order to establish a safe supply of drinking water for the population and better the economy. Explaining that the proposal would create jobs and make meeting regulations attainable, the system would create and uphold a higher standard of purity as a target goal created on the foundation laid by the Safe Water Drinking Act of 1974 – legislation that was responsible for establishing the monitoring of drinking water in regards to a set of standards for protecting the health of the community.

In order to secure a truly safe supply of drinking water, officials must take into consideration the health of the communities and prioritize the updating of aging water systems, the enforcement of water quality standards, and ensure that future funding for maintenance is available to maintain the highest quality drinking water – and the EPA is working to do just that as they continue to persevere towards their goal.

[Read More …]

Brownfields Job Training is a Win-Win for Job Creation and Environmental Protection

For nearly two decades, our Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program has helped put people to work by building a skilled, local environmental workforce equipped to take advantage of the job opportunities created when cleaning up brownfields sites. The program awards competitive grants to nonprofit organizations and other eligible entities to recruit, train and place unemployed and underemployed individuals living in brownfields communities, in a wide range of environmental careers. By doing so, EPA has touched and changed the lives of thousands of local community members, often including low-income and minority residents, and other individuals with extreme barriers to employment, by helping them develop skills they can use to find sustainable careers and opportunities for economic advancement.

Approximately 16,300 individuals have completed training, and of those, more than 11,900 individuals have been placed in full-time employment earning an average starting wage of over $14 an hour. This equates to a cumulative job placement rate of 73 percent of graduates.

EPA is pleased to announce today the selection of 14 new entities that continue this local approach to environmental protection.

To hear directly from individuals who have completed training funded by EPA’s Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program, please visit:

For more information on Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training grantees, including past EWDJT grantees, please visit:
https://cfpub.epa.gov/bf_factsheets/

For more information on EPA’s Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program, please visit:
https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/environmental-workforce-development-and-job-training-grants

[Read More …]

Brownfields Job Training is a Win-Win for Job Creation and Environmental Protection

For nearly two decades, our Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program has helped put people to work by building a skilled, local environmental workforce equipped to take advantage of the job opportunities created when cleaning up brownfields sites. The program awards competitive grants to nonprofit organizations and other eligible entities to recruit, train and place unemployed and underemployed individuals living in brownfields communities, in a wide range of environmental careers. By doing so, EPA has touched and changed the lives of thousands of local community members, often including low-income and minority residents, and other individuals with extreme barriers to employment, by helping them develop skills they can use to find sustainable careers and opportunities for economic advancement.

Approximately 16,300 individuals have completed training, and of those, more than 11,900 individuals have been placed in full-time employment earning an average starting wage of over $14 an hour. This equates to a cumulative job placement rate of 73 percent of graduates.

EPA is pleased to announce today the selection of 14 new entities that continue this local approach to environmental protection.

To hear directly from individuals who have completed training funded by EPA’s Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program, please visit:

For more information on Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training grantees, including past EWDJT grantees, please visit:
https://cfpub.epa.gov/bf_factsheets/

For more information on EPA’s Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program, please visit:
https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/environmental-workforce-development-and-job-training-grants

[Read More …]

Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Success Stories: Tacoma, Washington

EPA’s Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) program is aimed at improving the environmental health of communities nationwide while improving the livelihood of the residents who live in those communities. Over the years, successful EWDJT programs have been implemented throughout the country, impacting the lives of many. In his own words, here is how the EPA Brownfields EWDJT program allowed Ricardo Loza to change his career:

Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Success Stories: Tacoma, Washington

I spent over 20 years of my professional life in the transportation business, working in operations, pricing and management before losing my job during the recession in 2008. In January 2013, after being unemployed for nearly five years, I found myself in Tacoma, WA applying for food stamps for the first time in my life. Like most people, I’ve had good and bad times; this for me was the very lowest point in my life. As I walked out of the Washington Department of Social and Health Services office, I spotted a flyer for the City of Tacoma’s environmental job training program.

I went back to where I was staying and asked the person I was renting a room from to please bear with me while I took a six-week course. Thankfully, they agreed to put off my rent for two months.
On orientation day, I saw all those text books and wondered what I had gotten myself into.

What seemed like an insurmountable task turned into a step by step progression in learning the skill for each certification, thanks to my wonderful instructors, Chris Goodman and Bill Routely, who kept us focused. At age 50, I was the oldest person in my class and I felt I was at a disadvantage. A feeling that was only exacerbated when I went to look for work.

As part of the graduation ceremony, there was a sign-up sheet for TCB Industrial to attend a group interview. I got a call back from my would-be predecessor asking me to attend. With TCB being a temporary labor contractor, my thought was I could gather some money and move forward looking for permanent employment. As our group was leaving, I mentioned to her that when she reviews my resume she will see I have several years of administrative and office experience. I told her I could apply my recent training in the hazardous materials business along with my existing years of experience with the full Microsoft suite to work as temporary office help for TCB.

Unbeknownst to me, she had just submitted her two weeks’ notice to TCB Industrial the day prior. I found out later that she submitted my name and resume to the owner of TCB as her possible replacement. I was called back in for a second interview. It went well. Combining my previous experience and recent environmental training made me the perfect candidate, which has led me to where I am today: The Pacific Northwest Director Operations for TCB Industrial Corporation.

I am certain I wouldn’t have been considered by my current employer without the direct HAZWOPER training provided by the EPA funded brownfields program. It’s a great honor, pleasure and privilege to continue to work with Clover Park Technical College, Goodwill of the Olympics, and EPA. Our combined efforts have allowed TCB Industrial to hire several EPA job training graduates and place them with brownfields projects throughout the Puget Sound region.

None of this would have been possible without the EPA Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program. For that I will be forever grateful.

Sincerely,
Ricardo Loza

 

# # #

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Read More …]

Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Success Stories: Richmond, California

EPA’s Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) program is aimed at improving the environmental health of communities nationwide while improving the livelihood of the residents who live in those communities. Over the years, successful EWDJT programs have been implemented throughout the country, impacting the lives of many. In his own words, here is how the EPA Brownfields EWDJT program allowed Jonathan Brito to change his career:

Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Success Stories: Richmond, California

Before I started on my journey at the RichmondBUILD Academy, I was a father to a beautiful 3-year-old daughter, and I had just been laid off of my 6-year career as an auto body technician. I ran into many career dead ends and depression set in. I then found myself in the middle of a heavy drug addiction.  I lost everything and found myself on the streets living a very hard life. I knew that I had to make things better and heard about a local job training program through the media. This job training program helped local residents, such as myself, start a career in the environmental remediation and construction industry with good living wages.

Jonathan Brito in his Tyvek suit during EPA funded HAZWOPER 40-hour training.

I was very fortunate to become a student at the RichmondBUILD Academy. I must admit it was not easy to get in the Academy and even harder to endure the twelve weeks of intensive training. They pushed me physically and mentally. They helped me regain my self-esteem and confidence. Through the RichmondBUILD program, I learned the skills and knowledge necessary to enter the environmental industry and earned valuable certifications, such as my Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) 40-hour certification, OSHA 10-hour, work zone safety, and first aid/CPR. The Academy also taught me to follow my passion: Solar!

Since my graduation, I’ve worked on the Freethy Industrial Park, a new, two-megawatt, ground-mounted solar project in Richmond and I’m currently employed with Ally Electric doing residential solar installation. I’ve also interviewed with firms that will install solar panels at a new 49-acre, 10.5 MW ground mount solar farm on a former brownfield site in Richmond, California. Most importantly, I have the love of my daughter and family again!

I owe a huge debt of gratitude to the City of Richmond, EPA, and the RichmondBUILD Academy. I don’t know where I’d be today without them. I’m forever thankful for the opportunities that have been presented to me. As I look to the future, I would like to become a local contractor and hire people that have been in the same predicament as me. And I will definitely hire them from RichmondBUILD!

–###–

[Read More …]

Historias exitosas del Programa de Capacitación de Empleos y Desarrollo de la Fuerza Laboral Ambiental

Tacoma, Washington

El Programa de Capacitación de Empleos y Desarrollo de la Fuerza Laboral Ambiental de la EPA (EWDJT, por sus siglas en inglés) está destinado a mejorar la salud ambiental de las comunidades a nivel nacional mientras mejora el medio de sustento para los residentes que viven en estas comunidades. A lo largo de los años, los programas EWDJT han sido implementados en todo el país, impactando las vidas de muchos. En sus propias palabras, vea cómo el programa EWDJT de Brownfields de la EPA permitió que Ricardo Loza combiara su carrera:

Pasé más de 20 años de mi vida professional en el negocio de transportación, trabajando en operaciones, cotización de precios y gerencia antes de perder mi empleo durante la recesión del 2008. En enero del 2013, después de estar desempleado por casi cinco años, me encontré en Tacoma, WA solicitando cupones de alimentos por la primera vez en mi vida. Como mucha gente, he tenido tiempos buenos y tiempos malos; este para mí fue el punto más bajo de mi vida. Mientras salía de la oficina del Departamento de Servicios Sociales y de Salud de Washington, vi una boletin acerca del programa de capacitación de empleos ambientales de la Ciudad de Tacoma.

Regresé adonde me estaba quedando y le dije a la persona de la cual estaba alquilando la habitación, que tuviera paciencia conmigo porque iba a tomar un curso de seis semanas. Por suerte, aplazaron el plago de mi alquiler por dos meses. El día de la orientación, vi todos los libros de texto y me pregunté a mí mismo en qué situación me había metido.

Lo que parecía una labor insuperable se convirtió en una progresión paso a paso hacia el aprendizaje de las destrezas para cada certificación, gracias a mis instructores increibles, Chris Goodman y Bill Routely, nos mantuvimos centrados en la meta. A mi edad de 50 años, yo era la persona con mayor edad en la clase y me sentía desaventajado. Un sentimiento que tan solo se exacerbó cuando empecé a buscar trabajo.

Como parte de la ceremonia de graduación, había una hoja de TCB Industrial para alistarse para asistir a una entrevista de grupo. Recibí una llamada de quien se convertiría en mi predecesora para que asistiera. Como TCB era un contratista de empleos temporeros, pensé que iba a ganar algún dinero y luego buscar un empleado permanente. Cuando nuestro grupo comenzó a retirarse, le mencioné que cuando revisara mi resumé viera que ya yo tenia varios años de experiencia administrativa y de trabajar en oficinas. Le dije que yo podría aplicar mi reciente capacitación en el negocio de manejo de materiales peligrosos en conjunto con mi existente experiencia en el suite Microsoft para trabajar como oficinista temporero para ayudar a TCB.

Sin saberlo, ella acababa de someter su notificación de renuncia de dos semanas a TCB Industrial el día anterior. Luego me enteré que ella había sometido mi nombre y mi resumé al dueño de TCB para que yo fuera su possible reemplazo. Me llamaron para una segunda entrevista. Salió bien. El combinar mi experiencia previa, con la capacitación medioambiental reciente me convirtió en el candidato perfecto, lo cual me ha llevado a donde estoy hoy: el Director de Operaciones para el Pacifico Noroeste de la Corporación Industrial TCB.

Estoy seguro que mi patrono actual no me hubiese considerado sin la capacitación directa de HAZWOPER provista bajo el programa brownfields financiado por la EPA. Es un gran honor, placer y privilegio continuar trabajando con el Colegio Técnico de Clover Park, y los Juegos de la Buena Voluntad de los Juegos Olímpicos, y con la EPA. Nuestros esfuerzos combinados han permitido que TCB Industrial emplee a varios graduandos del prorama de capacitación de empleos de la EPA y los coloque en varios proyectos brownfields en la region de Puget Sound.

Nada de esto hubiese sido possible sin el Programa de Capacitación de Empleos y Desarrollo de la Fuerza Laboral Ambiental. Por ello estoy eternamente agradecido.

Sinceramente,

Ricardo Loza

[Read More …]

Historias exitosas del Programa de Capacitación de Empleos y Desarrollo de la Fuerza Laboral Ambiental

Tacoma, Washington

El Programa de Capacitación de Empleos y Desarrollo de la Fuerza Laboral Ambiental de la EPA (EWDJT, por sus siglas en inglés) está destinado a mejorar la salud ambiental de las comunidades a nivel nacional mientras mejora el medio de sustento para los residentes que viven en estas comunidades. A lo largo de los años, los programas EWDJT han sido implementados en todo el país, impactando las vidas de muchos. En sus propias palabras, vea cómo el programa EWDJT de Brownfields de la EPA permitió que Ricardo Loza combiara su carrera:

Pasé más de 20 años de mi vida professional en el negocio de transportación, trabajando en operaciones, cotización de precios y gerencia antes de perder mi empleo durante la recesión del 2008. En enero del 2013, después de estar desempleado por casi cinco años, me encontré en Tacoma, WA solicitando cupones de alimentos por la primera vez en mi vida. Como mucha gente, he tenido tiempos buenos y tiempos malos; este para mí fue el punto más bajo de mi vida. Mientras salía de la oficina del Departamento de Servicios Sociales y de Salud de Washington, vi una boletin acerca del programa de capacitación de empleos ambientales de la Ciudad de Tacoma.

Regresé adonde me estaba quedando y le dije a la persona de la cual estaba alquilando la habitación, que tuviera paciencia conmigo porque iba a tomar un curso de seis semanas. Por suerte, aplazaron el plago de mi alquiler por dos meses. El día de la orientación, vi todos los libros de texto y me pregunté a mí mismo en qué situación me había metido.

Lo que parecía una labor insuperable se convirtió en una progresión paso a paso hacia el aprendizaje de las destrezas para cada certificación, gracias a mis instructores increibles, Chris Goodman y Bill Routely, nos mantuvimos centrados en la meta. A mi edad de 50 años, yo era la persona con mayor edad en la clase y me sentía desaventajado. Un sentimiento que tan solo se exacerbó cuando empecé a buscar trabajo.

Como parte de la ceremonia de graduación, había una hoja de TCB Industrial para alistarse para asistir a una entrevista de grupo. Recibí una llamada de quien se convertiría en mi predecesora para que asistiera. Como TCB era un contratista de empleos temporeros, pensé que iba a ganar algún dinero y luego buscar un empleado permanente. Cuando nuestro grupo comenzó a retirarse, le mencioné que cuando revisara mi resumé viera que ya yo tenia varios años de experiencia administrativa y de trabajar en oficinas. Le dije que yo podría aplicar mi reciente capacitación en el negocio de manejo de materiales peligrosos en conjunto con mi existente experiencia en el suite Microsoft para trabajar como oficinista temporero para ayudar a TCB.

Sin saberlo, ella acababa de someter su notificación de renuncia de dos semanas a TCB Industrial el día anterior. Luego me enteré que ella había sometido mi nombre y mi resumé al dueño de TCB para que yo fuera su possible reemplazo. Me llamaron para una segunda entrevista. Salió bien. El combinar mi experiencia previa, con la capacitación medioambiental reciente me convirtió en el candidato perfecto, lo cual me ha llevado a donde estoy hoy: el Director de Operaciones para el Pacifico Noroeste de la Corporación Industrial TCB.

Estoy seguro que mi patrono actual no me hubiese considerado sin la capacitación directa de HAZWOPER provista bajo el programa brownfields financiado por la EPA. Es un gran honor, placer y privilegio continuar trabajando con el Colegio Técnico de Clover Park, y los Juegos de la Buena Voluntad de los Juegos Olímpicos, y con la EPA. Nuestros esfuerzos combinados han permitido que TCB Industrial emplee a varios graduandos del prorama de capacitación de empleos de la EPA y los coloque en varios proyectos brownfields en la region de Puget Sound.

Nada de esto hubiese sido possible sin el Programa de Capacitación de Empleos y Desarrollo de la Fuerza Laboral Ambiental. Por ello estoy eternamente agradecido.

Sinceramente,

Ricardo Loza

[Read More …]