We all can do our part for the planet

Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Success Stories: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

By: Barry N. Breen, Acting Assistant Administrator, Office of Land and Emergency Management.

We are proud of the environmental and economic accomplishments made by local communities who use EPA resources provided through our Brownfields program to clean up and reuse brownfield sites. These communities demonstrate that a commitment to protecting public health, repurposing land, and strengthening local economies can be accomplished together.

Through our Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) program, we help communities tackle environmental challenges to spur their local economic growth. Recipients of RLF grants capitalize a revolving loan fund to provide low-interest loans and sub-grants to clean up brownfield sites. When loans are repaid, the repayment is returned into the fund and subsequently lent to other borrowers, providing an ongoing source of capital. These and other EPA brownfields grants leverage additional resources needed to clean up and redevelop brownfields.

So many projects, past and present, demonstrate that environmental improvement works hand-in-hand with economic development. One outstanding example can be found in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Several beige one story warehouses near a highway

Former Stewart Metal Site

The “Steelyard” redevelopment is situated on a historic Oklahoma City oil field on the east side of Bricktown. The 5-acre site was contaminated by a former metal manufacturing facility and past drilling and storage activities. Countless underground structures were found during cleanup including underground storage tanks, historic oil wells, and piping. The City of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, Oklahoma Corporation Commission and EPA all partnered to assist this complicated redevelopment. The City of Oklahoma City’s Brownfield RLF program loaned $1,300,000 to the project for environmental remediation and the remainder of the cleanup was paid for with private equity. It will be home to a mixed-use complex with retail shops on the first floor and housing above. It will offer 30 affordable housing units out of a total of 250 units in downtown Oklahoma City and will start leasing in summer of 2017.

Computer drawing of two multistory full block buildings, colored red and gray with interior courtyards.

Steelyard Apartment Rendering

West of this property, the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority (OCURA) owned a 1.38 acre site that had the same environmental problem and underwent a cleanup simultaneously with the Steelyard apartments. The City of Oklahoma City provided a $200,000 sub-grant to clean up the site. OCURA was then able to do an RFP for site redevelopment. The site is currently being redeveloped into two new hotels, the AC Hotel and a Hyatt place that will create new jobs and open in 2017.

Computerized drawing of a five story building with a large metal awning.

Hyatt Place Rendering

East of this property, the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority (OCURA) owns a 1.83 acre development. The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality awarded a $350,000 sub-grant and waived oversight costs for the cleanup of the project. Once the Steelyard apartments are complete, this property will be available for expansion of the apartment complex.

Computerized drawing of a five story building in gray and brown with a drive-in entrance.Projects like these demonstrate the value of our Brownfields program in communities across the country. Since the beginning of our Brownfields program in 1995, cumulative brownfield program investments across the country have leveraged more than $24 billion from a variety of public and private sources for cleanup and redevelopment activities and more than 124,759 jobs. On average, for every one EPA Brownfields dollar provided, $16.11 is leveraged, and on average, 8.5 jobs are leveraged per $100,000 of EPA brownfields funds expended on assessment, cleanup, and revolving loan fund cooperative agreements.

A study has shown that when brownfields are addressed, nearby property values within a 1.24-mile radius can increase 5-15.2 percent. Another study analyzing data near 48 brownfields found that an estimated $29 to $97 million in additional tax revenue is generated for local governments in a single year after cleanup. This is 2 to 7 times more than the $12.4 million EPA contributed to the cleanup of those brownfields.

We are proud of local communities’ accomplishments achieved by using our Brownfields program resources. We plan to continue to work with communities to help them clean up and reuse their brownfield sites; to protect public health, revitalize land and strengthen the economy.

[Read More …]

Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Success Stories: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

By: Barry N. Breen, Acting Assistant Administrator, Office of Land and Emergency Management.

We are proud of the environmental and economic accomplishments made by local communities who use EPA resources provided through our Brownfields program to clean up and reuse brownfield sites. These communities demonstrate that a commitment to protecting public health, repurposing land, and strengthening local economies can be accomplished together.

Through our Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) program, we help communities tackle environmental challenges to spur their local economic growth. Recipients of RLF grants capitalize a revolving loan fund to provide low-interest loans and sub-grants to clean up brownfield sites. When loans are repaid, the repayment is returned into the fund and subsequently lent to other borrowers, providing an ongoing source of capital. These and other EPA brownfields grants leverage additional resources needed to clean up and redevelop brownfields.

So many projects, past and present, demonstrate that environmental improvement works hand-in-hand with economic development. One outstanding example can be found in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Several beige one story warehouses near a highway

Former Stewart Metal Site

The “Steelyard” redevelopment is situated on a historic Oklahoma City oil field on the east side of Bricktown. The 5-acre site was contaminated by a former metal manufacturing facility and past drilling and storage activities. Countless underground structures were found during cleanup including underground storage tanks, historic oil wells, and piping. The City of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, Oklahoma Corporation Commission and EPA all partnered to assist this complicated redevelopment. The City of Oklahoma City’s Brownfield RLF program loaned $1,300,000 to the project for environmental remediation and the remainder of the cleanup was paid for with private equity. It will be home to a mixed-use complex with retail shops on the first floor and housing above. It will offer 30 affordable housing units out of a total of 250 units in downtown Oklahoma City and will start leasing in summer of 2017.

Computer drawing of two multistory full block buildings, colored red and gray with interior courtyards.

Steelyard Apartment Rendering

West of this property, the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority (OCURA) owned a 1.38 acre site that had the same environmental problem and underwent a cleanup simultaneously with the Steelyard apartments. The City of Oklahoma City provided a $200,000 sub-grant to clean up the site. OCURA was then able to do an RFP for site redevelopment. The site is currently being redeveloped into two new hotels, the AC Hotel and a Hyatt place that will create new jobs and open in 2017.

Computerized drawing of a five story building with a large metal awning.

Hyatt Place Rendering

East of this property, the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority (OCURA) owns a 1.83 acre development. The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality awarded a $350,000 sub-grant and waived oversight costs for the cleanup of the project. Once the Steelyard apartments are complete, this property will be available for expansion of the apartment complex.

Computerized drawing of a five story building in gray and brown with a drive-in entrance.Projects like these demonstrate the value of our Brownfields program in communities across the country. Since the beginning of our Brownfields program in 1995, cumulative brownfield program investments across the country have leveraged more than $24 billion from a variety of public and private sources for cleanup and redevelopment activities and more than 124,759 jobs. On average, for every one EPA Brownfields dollar provided, $16.11 is leveraged, and on average, 8.5 jobs are leveraged per $100,000 of EPA brownfields funds expended on assessment, cleanup, and revolving loan fund cooperative agreements.

A study has shown that when brownfields are addressed, nearby property values within a 1.24-mile radius can increase 5-15.2 percent. Another study analyzing data near 48 brownfields found that an estimated $29 to $97 million in additional tax revenue is generated for local governments in a single year after cleanup. This is 2 to 7 times more than the $12.4 million EPA contributed to the cleanup of those brownfields.

We are proud of local communities’ accomplishments achieved by using our Brownfields program resources. We plan to continue to work with communities to help them clean up and reuse their brownfield sites; to protect public health, revitalize land and strengthen the economy.

[Read More …]

Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Success Stories: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

By: Barry N. Breen, Acting Assistant Administrator, Office of Land and Emergency Management.

We are proud of the environmental and economic accomplishments made by local communities who use EPA resources provided through our Brownfields program to clean up and reuse brownfield sites. These communities demonstrate that a commitment to protecting public health, repurposing land, and strengthening local economies can be accomplished together.

Through our Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) program, we help communities tackle environmental challenges to spur their local economic growth. Recipients of RLF grants capitalize a revolving loan fund to provide low-interest loans and sub-grants to clean up brownfield sites. When loans are repaid, the repayment is returned into the fund and subsequently lent to other borrowers, providing an ongoing source of capital. These and other EPA brownfields grants leverage additional resources needed to clean up and redevelop brownfields.

So many projects, past and present, demonstrate that environmental improvement works hand-in-hand with economic development. One outstanding example can be found in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Several beige one story warehouses near a highway

Former Stewart Metal Site

The “Steelyard” redevelopment is situated on a historic Oklahoma City oil field on the east side of Bricktown. The 5-acre site was contaminated by a former metal manufacturing facility and past drilling and storage activities. Countless underground structures were found during cleanup including underground storage tanks, historic oil wells, and piping. The City of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, Oklahoma Corporation Commission and EPA all partnered to assist this complicated redevelopment. The City of Oklahoma City’s Brownfield RLF program loaned $1,300,000 to the project for environmental remediation and the remainder of the cleanup was paid for with private equity. It will be home to a mixed-use complex with retail shops on the first floor and housing above. It will offer 30 affordable housing units out of a total of 250 units in downtown Oklahoma City and will start leasing in summer of 2017.

Computer drawing of two multistory full block buildings, colored red and gray with interior courtyards.

Steelyard Apartment Rendering

West of this property, the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority (OCURA) owned a 1.38 acre site that had the same environmental problem and underwent a cleanup simultaneously with the Steelyard apartments. The City of Oklahoma City provided a $200,000 sub-grant to clean up the site. OCURA was then able to do an RFP for site redevelopment. The site is currently being redeveloped into two new hotels, the AC Hotel and a Hyatt place that will create new jobs and open in 2017.

Computerized drawing of a five story building with a large metal awning.

Hyatt Place Rendering

East of this property, the Oklahoma City Urban Renewal Authority (OCURA) owns a 1.83 acre development. The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality awarded a $350,000 sub-grant and waived oversight costs for the cleanup of the project. Once the Steelyard apartments are complete, this property will be available for expansion of the apartment complex.

Computerized drawing of a five story building in gray and brown with a drive-in entrance.Projects like these demonstrate the value of our Brownfields program in communities across the country. Since the beginning of our Brownfields program in 1995, cumulative brownfield program investments across the country have leveraged more than $24 billion from a variety of public and private sources for cleanup and redevelopment activities and more than 124,759 jobs. On average, for every one EPA Brownfields dollar provided, $16.11 is leveraged, and on average, 8.5 jobs are leveraged per $100,000 of EPA brownfields funds expended on assessment, cleanup, and revolving loan fund cooperative agreements.

A study has shown that when brownfields are addressed, nearby property values within a 1.24-mile radius can increase 5-15.2 percent. Another study analyzing data near 48 brownfields found that an estimated $29 to $97 million in additional tax revenue is generated for local governments in a single year after cleanup. This is 2 to 7 times more than the $12.4 million EPA contributed to the cleanup of those brownfields.

We are proud of local communities’ accomplishments achieved by using our Brownfields program resources. We plan to continue to work with communities to help them clean up and reuse their brownfield sites; to protect public health, revitalize land and strengthen the economy.

[Read More …]

Wastewater Reuse in Agriculture: It’s More Common Than You Might Think

New studies have revealed that the reuse of untreated wastewater collected from cities is a much more common practice than what was originally assumed. Where previous studies used the analysis of case studies to determine the frequency of incidence in untreated wastewater reuse in agriculture, newer methods of comprehension, such as geographic information systems, are being put to use in more recent studies. These more conclusive methods of study have measured more than just the direct reuse of wastewater – in fact, they’ve been able to successfully investigate the frequency of indirect reuse of wastewater – an assessment not possible before. 

Since a method for assessing indirect wastewater reuse hasn’t existed until recently, the majority of untreated wastewater re-use had gone un-noticed for years, illustrating a picture that is far from the reality. The reuse of untreated wastewater for agricultural purposes has been much more widespread than society has been led to believe. 

With the health of the public remaining one of the top priorities, researchers emphasize the importance of establishing sustainable methods for effectively treating wastewater for its reuse on farms and in the preparation of food items. With resources limited in third world countries, new methods of treating wastewater at a capacity that is feasible are a necessity for procuring health and growth. 

Farmers reliant on the use of wastewater for irrigation are often prepared to use raw, untreated wastewater to meet the needs of their agricultural practices. With a large supply of nutrients present in untreated wastewater, its use generates a higher rate of crop growth and decreases the need for excessive amounts of fertilizers – serving as a cost-effective method for sustaining crops and producing a plentiful harvest. 

Unfortunately, the massive health risk that accompanies the improper or absent treatment of wastewater reuse for farming and irrigation purposes is substantial. A large number of farmers, consumers, and vendors have exposed the potentially harmful bacteria that has the potential to make severely ill. On the flip side, organic matter and nutrients within the wastewater have the potential to sustain and grow agriculture, leading to a more secure future for many communities. 

The end goal is to uncover a way in which we can harness the potential of wastewater and other available resources to achieve growth and prosperity while simultaneously protecting the best interest, and ultimately the health, of the people. 

Interested in learning more about advanced wastewater treatment technologies for agriculture? Contact us today. 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

Wastewater Reuse in Agriculture: It’s More Common Than You Might Think

New studies have revealed that the reuse of untreated wastewater collected from cities is a much more common practice than what was originally assumed. Where previous studies used the analysis of case studies to determine the frequency of incidence in untreated wastewater reuse in agriculture, newer methods of comprehension, such as geographic information systems, are being put to use in more recent studies. These more conclusive methods of study have measured more than just the direct reuse of wastewater – in fact, they’ve been able to successfully investigate the frequency of indirect reuse of wastewater – an assessment not possible before. 

Since a method for assessing indirect wastewater reuse hasn’t existed until recently, the majority of untreated wastewater re-use had gone un-noticed for years, illustrating a picture that is far from the reality. The reuse of untreated wastewater for agricultural purposes has been much more widespread than society has been led to believe. 

With the health of the public remaining one of the top priorities, researchers emphasize the importance of establishing sustainable methods for effectively treating wastewater for its reuse on farms and in the preparation of food items. With resources limited in third world countries, new methods of treating wastewater at a capacity that is feasible are a necessity for procuring health and growth. 

Farmers reliant on the use of wastewater for irrigation are often prepared to use raw, untreated wastewater to meet the needs of their agricultural practices. With a large supply of nutrients present in untreated wastewater, its use generates a higher rate of crop growth and decreases the need for excessive amounts of fertilizers – serving as a cost-effective method for sustaining crops and producing a plentiful harvest. 

Unfortunately, the massive health risk that accompanies the improper or absent treatment of wastewater reuse for farming and irrigation purposes is substantial. A large number of farmers, consumers, and vendors have exposed the potentially harmful bacteria that has the potential to make severely ill. On the flip side, organic matter and nutrients within the wastewater have the potential to sustain and grow agriculture, leading to a more secure future for many communities. 

The end goal is to uncover a way in which we can harness the potential of wastewater and other available resources to achieve growth and prosperity while simultaneously protecting the best interest, and ultimately the health, of the people. 

Interested in learning more about advanced wastewater treatment technologies for agriculture? Contact us today. 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

Wastewater Reuse in Agriculture: It’s More Common Than You Might Think

New studies have revealed that the reuse of untreated wastewater collected from cities is a much more common practice than what was originally assumed. Where previous studies used the analysis of case studies to determine the frequency of incidence in untreated wastewater reuse in agriculture, newer methods of comprehension, such as geographic information systems, are being put to use in more recent studies. These more conclusive methods of study have measured more than just the direct reuse of wastewater – in fact, they’ve been able to successfully investigate the frequency of indirect reuse of wastewater – an assessment not possible before. 

Since a method for assessing indirect wastewater reuse hasn’t existed until recently, the majority of untreated wastewater re-use had gone un-noticed for years, illustrating a picture that is far from the reality. The reuse of untreated wastewater for agricultural purposes has been much more widespread than society has been led to believe. 

With the health of the public remaining one of the top priorities, researchers emphasize the importance of establishing sustainable methods for effectively treating wastewater for its reuse on farms and in the preparation of food items. With resources limited in third world countries, new methods of treating wastewater at a capacity that is feasible are a necessity for procuring health and growth. 

Farmers reliant on the use of wastewater for irrigation are often prepared to use raw, untreated wastewater to meet the needs of their agricultural practices. With a large supply of nutrients present in untreated wastewater, its use generates a higher rate of crop growth and decreases the need for excessive amounts of fertilizers – serving as a cost-effective method for sustaining crops and producing a plentiful harvest. 

Unfortunately, the massive health risk that accompanies the improper or absent treatment of wastewater reuse for farming and irrigation purposes is substantial. A large number of farmers, consumers, and vendors have exposed the potentially harmful bacteria that has the potential to make severely ill. On the flip side, organic matter and nutrients within the wastewater have the potential to sustain and grow agriculture, leading to a more secure future for many communities. 

The end goal is to uncover a way in which we can harness the potential of wastewater and other available resources to achieve growth and prosperity while simultaneously protecting the best interest, and ultimately the health, of the people. 

Interested in learning more about advanced wastewater treatment technologies for agriculture? Contact us today. 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

Wastewater Reuse in Agriculture: It’s More Common Than You Might Think

New studies have revealed that the reuse of untreated wastewater collected from cities is a much more common practice than what was originally assumed. Where previous studies used the analysis of case studies to determine the frequency of incidence in untreated wastewater reuse in agriculture, newer methods of comprehension, such as geographic information systems, are being put to use in more recent studies. These more conclusive methods of study have measured more than just the direct reuse of wastewater – in fact, they’ve been able to successfully investigate the frequency of indirect reuse of wastewater – an assessment not possible before. 

Since a method for assessing indirect wastewater reuse hasn’t existed until recently, the majority of untreated wastewater re-use had gone un-noticed for years, illustrating a picture that is far from the reality. The reuse of untreated wastewater for agricultural purposes has been much more widespread than society has been led to believe. 

With the health of the public remaining one of the top priorities, researchers emphasize the importance of establishing sustainable methods for effectively treating wastewater for its reuse on farms and in the preparation of food items. With resources limited in third world countries, new methods of treating wastewater at a capacity that is feasible are a necessity for procuring health and growth. 

Farmers reliant on the use of wastewater for irrigation are often prepared to use raw, untreated wastewater to meet the needs of their agricultural practices. With a large supply of nutrients present in untreated wastewater, its use generates a higher rate of crop growth and decreases the need for excessive amounts of fertilizers – serving as a cost-effective method for sustaining crops and producing a plentiful harvest. 

Unfortunately, the massive health risk that accompanies the improper or absent treatment of wastewater reuse for farming and irrigation purposes is substantial. A large number of farmers, consumers, and vendors have exposed the potentially harmful bacteria that has the potential to make severely ill. On the flip side, organic matter and nutrients within the wastewater have the potential to sustain and grow agriculture, leading to a more secure future for many communities. 

The end goal is to uncover a way in which we can harness the potential of wastewater and other available resources to achieve growth and prosperity while simultaneously protecting the best interest, and ultimately the health, of the people. 

Interested in learning more about advanced wastewater treatment technologies for agriculture? Contact us today. 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

New Midstream Water Sector Develops in Response to Increased Water Needs in the Oil and Gas Industries

As the oil and gas industries continue to increase lateral drilling operations, the industries need for water resources continue to increase respectively. Fracking operations have dramatically increased, propelling the lucrative industries forward at a rate that has proven difficult to sustain in terms of water supply and financial demand. Now requiring three times the amount of water, fracking operations are racking up an impressive bill that is expected to meet or exceed at least $136 billion over the course of the next ten years.

As the need for water to sustain fracking operations increases, the cost and financial ability to meet those needs will also climb – it is this troubling realization that has industry leaders frantically searching for ways for operators to effectively cut costs accrued through water usage, machine use, and maintenance. In 2016 alone, the Marcellus and Permian fracking operations spending reached nearly $200 million – and it is expected to rise exponentially this year to approximately $300 million.

The increase in demand for water services essential for supporting fracking operations has led many water transport firms to capitalize on the current market, leveraging their company assets to build more pipeline networks and transportation services. Having established a substantial lead in the development of horizontal wells throughout the last six years, Texas and Oklahoma dominate the oil and gas industries through their fracking efforts.

It’s interesting to note that salt water wells mitigate the needs for excessive water re-use service in areas that aren’t able to generate water for its re-use in fracking efforts – leaving only about 10% of water to be sourced through treatment and reuse systems. It is through this method that Texas and Oklahoma have been fortunate enough to sustain their needs for water resources, effectively reducing the overall cost of their operations. However, Ohio and Pennsylvania are located in regions that pose more of a topographical challenge, making well solutions hard to come by. It’s in these less fortunate regions that water service costs visibly skyrocket. 

As the water management and services industry continues to adapt and evolve to meet the needs of the gas and oil industries, trends emerge, leading local water authorities to entertain potential business opportunities while transportation businesses divert their focus to their potential role in water management and transport services. As industries keep pressing forward to achieve a common goal in which all will profit, water reuse is projected to steadily increase to 16% over the course of the next ten years – and the environment is reaping the water conservation benefits.

Interested in learning more about advanced wastewater treatment technologies? Contact us today. 

 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

New Midstream Water Sector Develops in Response to Increased Water Needs in the Oil and Gas Industries

As the oil and gas industries continue to increase lateral drilling operations, the industries need for water resources continue to increase respectively. Fracking operations have dramatically increased, propelling the lucrative industries forward at a rate that has proven difficult to sustain in terms of water supply and financial demand. Now requiring three times the amount of water, fracking operations are racking up an impressive bill that is expected to meet or exceed at least $136 billion over the course of the next ten years.

As the need for water to sustain fracking operations increases, the cost and financial ability to meet those needs will also climb – it is this troubling realization that has industry leaders frantically searching for ways for operators to effectively cut costs accrued through water usage, machine use, and maintenance. In 2016 alone, the Marcellus and Permian fracking operations spending reached nearly $200 million – and it is expected to rise exponentially this year to approximately $300 million.

The increase in demand for water services essential for supporting fracking operations has led many water transport firms to capitalize on the current market, leveraging their company assets to build more pipeline networks and transportation services. Having established a substantial lead in the development of horizontal wells throughout the last six years, Texas and Oklahoma dominate the oil and gas industries through their fracking efforts.

It’s interesting to note that salt water wells mitigate the needs for excessive water re-use service in areas that aren’t able to generate water for its re-use in fracking efforts – leaving only about 10% of water to be sourced through treatment and reuse systems. It is through this method that Texas and Oklahoma have been fortunate enough to sustain their needs for water resources, effectively reducing the overall cost of their operations. However, Ohio and Pennsylvania are located in regions that pose more of a topographical challenge, making well solutions hard to come by. It’s in these less fortunate regions that water service costs visibly skyrocket. 

As the water management and services industry continues to adapt and evolve to meet the needs of the gas and oil industries, trends emerge, leading local water authorities to entertain potential business opportunities while transportation businesses divert their focus to their potential role in water management and transport services. As industries keep pressing forward to achieve a common goal in which all will profit, water reuse is projected to steadily increase to 16% over the course of the next ten years – and the environment is reaping the water conservation benefits.

Interested in learning more about advanced wastewater treatment technologies? Contact us today. 

 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

New Midstream Water Sector Develops in Response to Increased Water Needs in the Oil and Gas Industries

As the oil and gas industries continue to increase lateral drilling operations, the industries need for water resources continue to increase respectively. Fracking operations have dramatically increased, propelling the lucrative industries forward at a rate that has proven difficult to sustain in terms of water supply and financial demand. Now requiring three times the amount of water, fracking operations are racking up an impressive bill that is expected to meet or exceed at least $136 billion over the course of the next ten years.

As the need for water to sustain fracking operations increases, the cost and financial ability to meet those needs will also climb – it is this troubling realization that has industry leaders frantically searching for ways for operators to effectively cut costs accrued through water usage, machine use, and maintenance. In 2016 alone, the Marcellus and Permian fracking operations spending reached nearly $200 million – and it is expected to rise exponentially this year to approximately $300 million.

The increase in demand for water services essential for supporting fracking operations has led many water transport firms to capitalize on the current market, leveraging their company assets to build more pipeline networks and transportation services. Having established a substantial lead in the development of horizontal wells throughout the last six years, Texas and Oklahoma dominate the oil and gas industries through their fracking efforts.

It’s interesting to note that salt water wells mitigate the needs for excessive water re-use service in areas that aren’t able to generate water for its re-use in fracking efforts – leaving only about 10% of water to be sourced through treatment and reuse systems. It is through this method that Texas and Oklahoma have been fortunate enough to sustain their needs for water resources, effectively reducing the overall cost of their operations. However, Ohio and Pennsylvania are located in regions that pose more of a topographical challenge, making well solutions hard to come by. It’s in these less fortunate regions that water service costs visibly skyrocket. 

As the water management and services industry continues to adapt and evolve to meet the needs of the gas and oil industries, trends emerge, leading local water authorities to entertain potential business opportunities while transportation businesses divert their focus to their potential role in water management and transport services. As industries keep pressing forward to achieve a common goal in which all will profit, water reuse is projected to steadily increase to 16% over the course of the next ten years – and the environment is reaping the water conservation benefits.

Interested in learning more about advanced wastewater treatment technologies? Contact us today. 

 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]