We all can do our part for the planet

Maintaining Conservation Awareness and Accountability Beyond Times of Water Shortage

 

 It’s not uncommon to observe an increase in behavior conducive to water conservation in times of obvious water shortage, but in order to remedy waste tendencies, these practices and the heightened level of awareness must continue in times when the resource is plenty.

During one of the most lengthy droughts that lasted an astonishing 5 years, the state of California saw a notable increase in awareness of personal consumption and an impressive positive shift in conservation efforts in the short-term. Conservatory inclination was primarily due to the present lack of water and impending unavailability of the resource, prompting residents to limit their usage of such a valuable resource.

The drought prompted residents to install and implement the use of rainwater and gray-water conservation systems in an effort to reduce consumption and limit waste. Through these efforts, a remarkable emergence of ethical value became widespread, bringing new life to the parched state. Water consumption reached a record low at a rate of 57.5 gallons per person daily – a proposed target range that was once viewed as impossible to achieve.

It’s surprising that more people aren’t utilizing the collection of rainwater to accommodate their water consumption needs. Drastically reducing the footprint of consumption in a simple and effective way, gray-water conservation systems make the task incredibly easy, leaving a substantial amount of water from river sources unscathed.

During drought, awareness skyrockets – media, local utility authority and communities all prioritize awareness and accountability of water consumption. The issue lies in times when the resource isn’t abundantly scarce. People are inclined to assume that when droughts have resolved, there is no longer a need to be conscious of water consumption, however, this belief is simply not true.

Executive Director of Wholly H2O, Elizabeth Dougherty, explains that water remains one of the most valuable molecules responsible for sustaining life of our entire population and it should be acknowledged and respected as such. By showing gratitude for our life-source in times of both drought and plenty, we can avoid future water crises, and we will develop an overall higher level of respect and consciousness of our consumption patterns and the health of our people and our earth.

The reality is, we currently draw approximately 80% of urban water stores from rivers. When we contemplate the long-term effects that the depletion of our water sources pose, it’s evident why the need exists to be perpetually mindful of our impact on our environment and our consumption of our most vital resource. If the residential and agricultural communities collaborate to collectively conserve water, our watersheds may remain capable of nourishing generations to come.

 Interested in learning more about water conservation and reuse technologies? Contact us today. 

 

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A Record Investment

by Tom Damm

 3…2…1…  On cue, EPA, state and local officials dug their shovels into the softened dirt to formally kick off major upgrades to the wastewater treatment plant in Reading, Pennsylvania.

There was reason to be all smiles as the battery of professional and smart phone cameras captured the moment.  The improvements will contribute to local economic growth and lead to cleaner plant discharges to the Schuylkill River, where concerted efforts along the waterway are improving a drinking water source for more than 1.5 million people.

For EPA, it was the largest amount of water infrastructure funding ever applied to a single project in the Mid-Atlantic region – nearly $150 million – a fact that EPA Acting Regional Administrator Cecil Rodrigues shared with the audience at the groundbreaking ceremony.

The record sum of low-interest financing from EPA’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) was provided to Reading through actions of the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority, or PENNVEST.

Coincidentally, the day before the event, the PENNVEST board approved a series of projects that brought the collective total of its infrastructure investment efforts to more than $8 billion over nearly three decades.   The CWSRF and EPA’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund together supplied about half of that total.

The upgrades to the Fritz Island plant will allow for growth in the system that now treats sewage for about 200,000 residents in Reading and a dozen suburban communities.  By taking advantage of the 1 percent CWSRF rate compared to current market rates for bonds, Reading is expected to save almost $2.5 million over 20 years.

The plant upgrades are targeted for completion by late 2019 when officials will trade their shiny, ceremonial shovels for sets of oversized scissors.

You can learn more here about the CWSRF and the projects financed in your area.  And check out this link for information on a major boost in funding just approved for EPA’s Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program.

 

About the Author: Tom Damm has been with EPA since 2002 and now serves as communications coordinator for the region’s Water Protection Division.

 

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A Record Investment

by Tom Damm

 3…2…1…  On cue, EPA, state and local officials dug their shovels into the softened dirt to formally kick off major upgrades to the wastewater treatment plant in Reading, Pennsylvania.

There was reason to be all smiles as the battery of professional and smart phone cameras captured the moment.  The improvements will contribute to local economic growth and lead to cleaner plant discharges to the Schuylkill River, where concerted efforts along the waterway are improving a drinking water source for more than 1.5 million people.

For EPA, it was the largest amount of water infrastructure funding ever applied to a single project in the Mid-Atlantic region – nearly $150 million – a fact that EPA Acting Regional Administrator Cecil Rodrigues shared with the audience at the groundbreaking ceremony.

The record sum of low-interest financing from EPA’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) was provided to Reading through actions of the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority, or PENNVEST.

Coincidentally, the day before the event, the PENNVEST board approved a series of projects that brought the collective total of its infrastructure investment efforts to more than $8 billion over nearly three decades.   The CWSRF and EPA’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund together supplied about half of that total.

The upgrades to the Fritz Island plant will allow for growth in the system that now treats sewage for about 200,000 residents in Reading and a dozen suburban communities.  By taking advantage of the 1 percent CWSRF rate compared to current market rates for bonds, Reading is expected to save almost $2.5 million over 20 years.

The plant upgrades are targeted for completion by late 2019 when officials will trade their shiny, ceremonial shovels for sets of oversized scissors.

You can learn more here about the CWSRF and the projects financed in your area.  And check out this link for information on a major boost in funding just approved for EPA’s Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program.

 

About the Author: Tom Damm has been with EPA since 2002 and now serves as communications coordinator for the region’s Water Protection Division.

 

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Secretary of the Interior Affirms More Than $23 Million to go to Water Reclaim and Reuse Efforts 

Secretary Zinke recently announced that more than $23 million will be dispersed to seven states, designated for water reclamation efforts, water reuse projects and initiatives, and studies that aim at analyzing the efficacy of water recycling efforts, further propelling the clean water movement. 

The funding will allow for the recycling and reuse of reclaimed ground and surface water sources, making it possible for the acquisition of tools necessary for dispersing water throughout communities facing water scarcity issues.   As these essential tools are only a piece of the solution to the water scarcity puzzle, a portion of funding will go towards helping communities in need develop systems capable of storing larger capacities of reclaimed and recycled water for reuse. 

Approved by Congress, the reclamation project will allocate funding for all facets of the project, from planning, to design, and necessary construction assignments. Six specific projects will receive the majority of the funding according to need in various amounts. The projects include the City of Pasadena Water and Power Department’s, Pasadena Non-Potable Water Project, the City of San Diego’s, San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, the Hi-Desert Water District’s, Hi-Desert District Wastewater Reclamation Project, the Inland Empire Utilities Agency’s, Lower Chino Dairy Area Desalination and Reclamation Project, the Padre Dam Municipal Water District’s, San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, and the Santa Clara Valley Water District’s, South Santa Clara County Recycled Water Project. 

Thirteen other city-level studies in California, Utah, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Washington, and Nevada will receive a portion of the remaining funding. $1.7 million will be awarded to each study in varying amounts according to necessity to fund their efforts. 

Of the final almost $850,000 that remains, four research projects will be financed. Research initiatives include, the Demonstrating Innovative Control of Biological Fouling of Microfiltration/Ultrafiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membranes and Enhanced Chemical and Energy Efficiency in Potable Water, the Site-Specific Analytical testing of RO Brine Impacts to the Treatment Process, Pilot Test Project for Produced Water near Hardtner, Kansas, and the Pure Water Project Las Virgenes-Truinfo. 

While the funding awarded to each of the aforementioned studies, projects, and research initiatives seems substantial, the truth is that in order to resolve the water scarcity crisis, much more time, and money, will be necessary as water reclamation, recycle, and reuse is something that is only more recently become accepted as a suitable solution. With the many benefits that accompany reclamation processes, it’s clear that the investment is a just priority. 

Providing clean water to communities nationwide is the goal at the forefront of the initiative. With funding approved and provided by Congress, it is a step in the right direction in terms of establishing a sustainable clean water supply for all communities, in the hopes that one day we are able to assist other nations in implementing the same vital resource management. 

Interested in learning more about advance wastewater and treatment solutions for decentralized locations? Contact us today. 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

Secretary of the Interior Affirms More Than $23 Million to go to Water Reclaim and Reuse Efforts 

Secretary Zinke recently announced that more than $23 million will be dispersed to seven states, designated for water reclamation efforts, water reuse projects and initiatives, and studies that aim at analyzing the efficacy of water recycling efforts, further propelling the clean water movement. 

The funding will allow for the recycling and reuse of reclaimed ground and surface water sources, making it possible for the acquisition of tools necessary for dispersing water throughout communities facing water scarcity issues.   As these essential tools are only a piece of the solution to the water scarcity puzzle, a portion of funding will go towards helping communities in need develop systems capable of storing larger capacities of reclaimed and recycled water for reuse. 

Approved by Congress, the reclamation project will allocate funding for all facets of the project, from planning, to design, and necessary construction assignments. Six specific projects will receive the majority of the funding according to need in various amounts. The projects include the City of Pasadena Water and Power Department’s, Pasadena Non-Potable Water Project, the City of San Diego’s, San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, the Hi-Desert Water District’s, Hi-Desert District Wastewater Reclamation Project, the Inland Empire Utilities Agency’s, Lower Chino Dairy Area Desalination and Reclamation Project, the Padre Dam Municipal Water District’s, San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, and the Santa Clara Valley Water District’s, South Santa Clara County Recycled Water Project. 

Thirteen other city-level studies in California, Utah, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Washington, and Nevada will receive a portion of the remaining funding. $1.7 million will be awarded to each study in varying amounts according to necessity to fund their efforts. 

Of the final almost $850,000 that remains, four research projects will be financed. Research initiatives include, the Demonstrating Innovative Control of Biological Fouling of Microfiltration/Ultrafiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membranes and Enhanced Chemical and Energy Efficiency in Potable Water, the Site-Specific Analytical testing of RO Brine Impacts to the Treatment Process, Pilot Test Project for Produced Water near Hardtner, Kansas, and the Pure Water Project Las Virgenes-Truinfo. 

While the funding awarded to each of the aforementioned studies, projects, and research initiatives seems substantial, the truth is that in order to resolve the water scarcity crisis, much more time, and money, will be necessary as water reclamation, recycle, and reuse is something that is only more recently become accepted as a suitable solution. With the many benefits that accompany reclamation processes, it’s clear that the investment is a just priority. 

Providing clean water to communities nationwide is the goal at the forefront of the initiative. With funding approved and provided by Congress, it is a step in the right direction in terms of establishing a sustainable clean water supply for all communities, in the hopes that one day we are able to assist other nations in implementing the same vital resource management. 

Interested in learning more about advance wastewater and treatment solutions for decentralized locations? Contact us today. 

 

Learn More

[Read More …]

Don’t Miss Out This Winter – Collect Your Drop

Don’t Miss Out This Winter – Collect Your Drop Winter is upon us. Now is the perfect time to build that tank and start collecting that precious winter rain. Come summer, you’ll be glad you did. So, once I’ve chosen my Pioneer Water Tank, what next? There are two innovative systems that we offer to

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Santa Monica Turns To Water Reuse

As Santa Monica progresses towards achieving their citywide goal to become completely self-sufficient in their water sourcing, the city has recently introduced its new water reuse system at Santa Monica’s Los Amigos Park.

As Santa Monica progresses towards achieving their citywide goal to become completely self-sufficient in their water sourcing, the city has recently introduced its new water reuse system that will be put to use at Los Amigos Park this week. The system will aid in the city’s efforts towards self-sufficiency by collecting rainwater and runoff that naturally flows to the site for recycling and reuse at various locations throughout the park. 

The water will be treated at the site at which it is collected, and will then be distributed throughout the park to be used as water for flushing toilets and maintaining the lawn and gardens. As the city continues to pioneer dry weather runoff recycling and reuse collected from sprinklers and other sources of runoff, authorities are hopeful that their efforts will prompt other cities will install the systems and be compelled to follow suit. 

The city’s initiative took off after Dean Kubani, Santa Monica’s chief sustainability officer, shed light on the shortfalls of the city’s current method of acquiring water. Dependent on imports from the Colorado River and water resources in Northern California, Mr. Kubani expresses that these means of sourcing are both unsustainable and capable of making a significant negative impact on the bodies of water from which they are acquiring the majority of their water. 

The city is hopeful of the promise offered by the new system that is processing an average of 500,000 gallons of water each day. The water has already had the ability to sustain a variety of local parks, cemeteries, and buildings capable of utilizing recycled water. 

The project has overcome quite a few obstacles in that the city’s guidelines for water treatment had to be modified and adapted to allow the new method of collection and treatment. The new system utilizes an already present drain to collect the water runoff, and the water is then treated first by a filtration process, and then by UV treatment in order to rid the resulting water from potentially harmful pathogens that could jeopardize the health of any living body that might come into contact with it. Nearing purity of drinking water, the water is successfully treated and reused for use in flushing toilets and irrigation systems. 

The project is overseen by the city and the Santa Monica-Malibu School District, offering a great opportunity for education, continued innovation and a step in the right direction towards the city’s goal of total water self-sufficiency. Offering new application for water recycling from outdoor to indoor use, Santa Monica’s water recycling and reuse project is turning heads and sure to make new strides widespread in neighboring cities. 

If you’re interested in learning how your city can utilize advanced water recycling technologies to help conserve water, contact us today. 

Learn More

[Read More …]

Santa Monica Turns To Water Reuse

As Santa Monica progresses towards achieving their citywide goal to become completely self-sufficient in their water sourcing, the city has recently introduced its new water reuse system at Santa Monica’s Los Amigos Park.

As Santa Monica progresses towards achieving their citywide goal to become completely self-sufficient in their water sourcing, the city has recently introduced its new water reuse system that will be put to use at Los Amigos Park this week. The system will aid in the city’s efforts towards self-sufficiency by collecting rainwater and runoff that naturally flows to the site for recycling and reuse at various locations throughout the park. 

The water will be treated at the site at which it is collected, and will then be distributed throughout the park to be used as water for flushing toilets and maintaining the lawn and gardens. As the city continues to pioneer dry weather runoff recycling and reuse collected from sprinklers and other sources of runoff, authorities are hopeful that their efforts will prompt other cities will install the systems and be compelled to follow suit. 

The city’s initiative took off after Dean Kubani, Santa Monica’s chief sustainability officer, shed light on the shortfalls of the city’s current method of acquiring water. Dependent on imports from the Colorado River and water resources in Northern California, Mr. Kubani expresses that these means of sourcing are both unsustainable and capable of making a significant negative impact on the bodies of water from which they are acquiring the majority of their water. 

The city is hopeful of the promise offered by the new system that is processing an average of 500,000 gallons of water each day. The water has already had the ability to sustain a variety of local parks, cemeteries, and buildings capable of utilizing recycled water. 

The project has overcome quite a few obstacles in that the city’s guidelines for water treatment had to be modified and adapted to allow the new method of collection and treatment. The new system utilizes an already present drain to collect the water runoff, and the water is then treated first by a filtration process, and then by UV treatment in order to rid the resulting water from potentially harmful pathogens that could jeopardize the health of any living body that might come into contact with it. Nearing purity of drinking water, the water is successfully treated and reused for use in flushing toilets and irrigation systems. 

The project is overseen by the city and the Santa Monica-Malibu School District, offering a great opportunity for education, continued innovation and a step in the right direction towards the city’s goal of total water self-sufficiency. Offering new application for water recycling from outdoor to indoor use, Santa Monica’s water recycling and reuse project is turning heads and sure to make new strides widespread in neighboring cities. 

If you’re interested in learning how your city can utilize advanced water recycling technologies to help conserve water, contact us today. 

Learn More

[Read More …]

Santa Monica Turns To Water Reuse

As Santa Monica progresses towards achieving their citywide goal to become completely self-sufficient in their water sourcing, the city has recently introduced its new water reuse system at Santa Monica’s Los Amigos Park.

As Santa Monica progresses towards achieving their citywide goal to become completely self-sufficient in their water sourcing, the city has recently introduced its new water reuse system that will be put to use at Los Amigos Park this week. The system will aid in the city’s efforts towards self-sufficiency by collecting rainwater and runoff that naturally flows to the site for recycling and reuse at various locations throughout the park. 

The water will be treated at the site at which it is collected, and will then be distributed throughout the park to be used as water for flushing toilets and maintaining the lawn and gardens. As the city continues to pioneer dry weather runoff recycling and reuse collected from sprinklers and other sources of runoff, authorities are hopeful that their efforts will prompt other cities will install the systems and be compelled to follow suit. 

The city’s initiative took off after Dean Kubani, Santa Monica’s chief sustainability officer, shed light on the shortfalls of the city’s current method of acquiring water. Dependent on imports from the Colorado River and water resources in Northern California, Mr. Kubani expresses that these means of sourcing are both unsustainable and capable of making a significant negative impact on the bodies of water from which they are acquiring the majority of their water. 

The city is hopeful of the promise offered by the new system that is processing an average of 500,000 gallons of water each day. The water has already had the ability to sustain a variety of local parks, cemeteries, and buildings capable of utilizing recycled water. 

The project has overcome quite a few obstacles in that the city’s guidelines for water treatment had to be modified and adapted to allow the new method of collection and treatment. The new system utilizes an already present drain to collect the water runoff, and the water is then treated first by a filtration process, and then by UV treatment in order to rid the resulting water from potentially harmful pathogens that could jeopardize the health of any living body that might come into contact with it. Nearing purity of drinking water, the water is successfully treated and reused for use in flushing toilets and irrigation systems. 

The project is overseen by the city and the Santa Monica-Malibu School District, offering a great opportunity for education, continued innovation and a step in the right direction towards the city’s goal of total water self-sufficiency. Offering new application for water recycling from outdoor to indoor use, Santa Monica’s water recycling and reuse project is turning heads and sure to make new strides widespread in neighboring cities. 

If you’re interested in learning how your city can utilize advanced water recycling technologies to help conserve water, contact us today. 

Learn More

[Read More …]

Santa Monica Turns To Water Reuse

As Santa Monica progresses towards achieving their citywide goal to become completely self-sufficient in their water sourcing, the city has recently introduced its new water reuse system at Santa Monica’s Los Amigos Park.

As Santa Monica progresses towards achieving their citywide goal to become completely self-sufficient in their water sourcing, the city has recently introduced its new water reuse system that will be put to use at Los Amigos Park this week. The system will aid in the city’s efforts towards self-sufficiency by collecting rainwater and runoff that naturally flows to the site for recycling and reuse at various locations throughout the park. 

The water will be treated at the site at which it is collected, and will then be distributed throughout the park to be used as water for flushing toilets and maintaining the lawn and gardens. As the city continues to pioneer dry weather runoff recycling and reuse collected from sprinklers and other sources of runoff, authorities are hopeful that their efforts will prompt other cities will install the systems and be compelled to follow suit. 

The city’s initiative took off after Dean Kubani, Santa Monica’s chief sustainability officer, shed light on the shortfalls of the city’s current method of acquiring water. Dependent on imports from the Colorado River and water resources in Northern California, Mr. Kubani expresses that these means of sourcing are both unsustainable and capable of making a significant negative impact on the bodies of water from which they are acquiring the majority of their water. 

The city is hopeful of the promise offered by the new system that is processing an average of 500,000 gallons of water each day. The water has already had the ability to sustain a variety of local parks, cemeteries, and buildings capable of utilizing recycled water. 

The project has overcome quite a few obstacles in that the city’s guidelines for water treatment had to be modified and adapted to allow the new method of collection and treatment. The new system utilizes an already present drain to collect the water runoff, and the water is then treated first by a filtration process, and then by UV treatment in order to rid the resulting water from potentially harmful pathogens that could jeopardize the health of any living body that might come into contact with it. Nearing purity of drinking water, the water is successfully treated and reused for use in flushing toilets and irrigation systems. 

The project is overseen by the city and the Santa Monica-Malibu School District, offering a great opportunity for education, continued innovation and a step in the right direction towards the city’s goal of total water self-sufficiency. Offering new application for water recycling from outdoor to indoor use, Santa Monica’s water recycling and reuse project is turning heads and sure to make new strides widespread in neighboring cities. 

If you’re interested in learning how your city can utilize advanced water recycling technologies to help conserve water, contact us today. 

Learn More

[Read More …]